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Bendy Buses and Health Care

by Elaine Schwartz    •    Sep 6, 2010    •    249 Views

Have you heard of a bendy bus? The bendy bus was supposed to solve Santiago, Chile’s public transit problems. But the story relates to each of us.

It all began during 2007 when Santiago decided to replace its private bus system with public transit. Previously, with 3,000 different bus companies, the competition had been fierce and problematic. 1) Seeing a crowded bus stop, drivers would rev up their engines and race each other to get there first. Because of the accidents, injuries and conjestion, we could say competition was destructive. 2) Pollution was uncontrolled because buses were not licensed. 3) Although bus fares were quite low, the profitability ($60 million US dollars) made certain people question the ethics of making money by satisfying a basic municipal need.

To solve the three problems, the city took over the system. Here is where bendy buses enter the picture. Big and attractive, they safely navigated city streets.

Each of the problems was solved (but not really). 1) Drivers were told that on time service was crucial. Result? Buses were on time but empty as drivers skipped busy stops that might have delayed them. 2) Pollution was no longer a problem with the new buses. 3) Profits were no longer a concern because the system was losing lots of money ($600 million US dollars).

The Economic Lesson

In many ways, Santiago’s bus issues are our health issues.

1) Incentive: Which incentives will optimize service?

2) Pubic or private: How can we best provide the services we require?

3) Affordability: How can the cost of necessities be minimized?

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