Developing Economies

Developing economies are countries that display the earlier stages of a market system. Including China, India, the Philippines, they have fast growth rates and are helping propel the world economy. Because each one is different, econlife looks at examples of their businesses, consumers and governments.

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    Yak Herders

    May 3, 11 • 473 Views • No Comments

    Demand is soaring for yartsa gunbu, a “nutty tasting fungus” from China’s Tibetan Plateau and similar Himalayan regions in Nepal and Bhutan. Reputed to have cancer fighting capability, aging retardants, and libidinal qualities, the fungus......  [read more]

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    Doha Deadlock

    Apr 30, 11 • 420 Views • No Comments

    Can you convince a Lubbock, Texas cotton farmer (or his Congressman) to forgo his (maybe $150,000) cotton subsidy? Probably not. After all, these U.S. government payments let him profitably compete in world markets. Correspondingly, would China say yes to a......  [read more]

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    Putin’s Economics

    Apr 29, 11 • 381 Views • No Comments

    Our story begins during February when Russian Prime Minister Putin decided to freeze gasoline prices. Oil companies had a predictable response. They left. Following the money, they redirected their supply to higher prices elsewhere. The result? Russian......  [read more]

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    Health and GDP

    Apr 28, 11 • 389 Views • No Comments

    We are taller, healthier, heavier, and living longer. In 1790, a typical Frenchman weighed 110 pounds. Now, the scale says 170. That 60-pound difference relates to a lot more than food. According to a new book from Nobel prize winning economist Robert Fogel......  [read more]

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    Money and Happiness

    Apr 26, 11 • 342 Views • No Comments

    It is possible, after all, that money can make us happy. A recent Brookings paper from 3 University of Pennsylvania researchers concluded that people experience greater “subjective well-being” or life satisfaction when they are more affluent.......  [read more]