Developing Economies

Developing economies are countries that display the earlier stages of a market system. Including China, India, the Philippines, they have fast growth rates and are helping propel the world economy. Because each one is different, econlife looks at examples of their businesses, consumers and governments.

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    Passing the Euro Test

    Jan 2, 11 • 228 Views • No Comments

    Having just entered the euro zone, the Estonian kroon will be replaced by 194 million euro coins and 45 million bank notes. The process will take 2 weeks as the new currency replaces the old. Here are some pictures of Estonian euro coins and a picture and...  [read more]

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    Women and Competition

    Dec 30, 10 • 262 Views • No Comments

    Just a comment today on a study about females and competition. Comparing a matrilineal society in India to a patriarchal society in Tanzania, a 2007 study revealed a huge difference in how much women compete. These quotes are wonderfully representative: From...  [read more]

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    Different Kinds of Capitalism

    Dec 29, 10 • 314 Views • No Comments

    How much does Chinese capitalism resemble U.S. capitalism? In a New Yorker article, journalist John Cassidy suggests that China’s combination of authoritarianism and capitalism is somewhat similar to our own history. Reminding us of our...  [read more]

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    Made in China?

    Dec 26, 10 • 429 Views • No Comments

    True or false? Is Apple’s iPhone made in China? The answer is true and false. True. According to U.S. trade statistics, the iPhone is made in China. Consequently, the iPhone is recorded as a minus for us and a plus for China. It added to our trade...  [read more]

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    Unintended Green Incentives

    Dec 19, 10 • 227 Views • No Comments

    True or False? When we become more energy efficient, we use up fewer resources. This New Yorker Magazine article says maybe. Citing the “rebound effect,” the article briefly takes us back to Williams Jevons, England, and 1865. In a book called The...  [read more]