Economic Debates

Most economic decisions can be debated. We have to decide whether we want higher or lower taxes, where to cut government spending, whether the deficit matters, if a business should have more regulation, if marginal analysis should affect environmental regulation. Learning about economics involves defending policy alternatives.

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    Unaffordable Sports Stadiums

    Jul 13, 11 • 411 Views • No Comments

    The year is 1996. The place is Hamilton County, Ohio. You are standing in a voting booth deciding whether to approve a .5% sales tax increase to help build and maintain 2 new sports stadiums. Although the spending will exceed $500 million, you have been......  [read more]

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    Productivity: Working Weekends

    Jul 12, 11 • 303 Views • No Comments

    Israel has to decide when to have a weekend. The Israeli Sabbath, Friday sunset through Saturday sunset will be a part of it. The second day? Sunday and Friday are possibilities. Knowing that productivity is a major consideration, Israel’s prime......  [read more]

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    Raising (or Ignoring) the Debt Ceiling

    Jul 11, 11 • 331 Views • No Comments

    Washington Post cartoonist Tom Toles summarizes all we need to know about the politics of debt ceiling negotiations in these 33 political drawings. The first one starts with a Democrat/Republican card game in which each raises the ante. Others refer to the......  [read more]

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    Calorie Matters

    Jul 10, 11 • 350 Views • No Comments

    Learning that a Big Mac has 540 calories and a large fries, 500, will people select a salad? According to the Washington Post, “No.” We do not have the will power to avoid long term cost when faced with short term benefit. This takes us to the......  [read more]

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    Understanding the Jobs Report

    Jul 9, 11 • 369 Views • No Comments

    Hearing yesterday’s jobs report, most people said, “No good news.” Lower wages, almost no hiring, less time on the job and 9.2% unemployment meant more worries about the economy. These facts might provide some insight. The output gap:......  [read more]