Economic Growth

Growth is crucial for a market economy. Econlife looks at the different microeconomic and macroeconomic variables that affect growth like human capital, technology, and natural resources and monetary and fiscal policies.

  • Emerging Markets demand More MIlk

    More Expensive Ice Cream?

    Mar 13, 14 • 499 Views • No Comments

    Milk prices are going up. And yet, in the US, we are drinking less milk. According to Corey Geiger, managing editor of Hoard’s Dairyman magazine, one reason is oil. Countries in the Middle East with massive oil reserves have to import 90% of their......  [read more]

  • Unintended Consequences of Daylight Saving Time

    The Unexpected Impact of Changing Times

    Mar 9, 14 • 460 Views • No Comments

    Beyond less sleep, when we moved our clocks ahead last night, we created many unintended consequences. It all began during the 1880s when the railroads said that they should coordinate time. With railroad companies observing 52 different times and even more......  [read more]

  • eggs California Regulatory Policy

    The California/Missouri Chicken Cage Disagreement

    Mar 6, 14 • 1020 Views • No Comments

    Sort of like coach or first class, most of the chickens that lay our eggs live in a battery or a colony cage.  In the typical cage called the battery, a chicken has 67 square inches. By contrast, colony cages are spacious enclosures. Equipped with perches......  [read more]

  • Movie Attendance Price elasticity

    Ghostbuster Economics

    Mar 1, 14 • 560 Views • No Comments

    Yesterday, I watched Ghostbusters for the first time. Having read in Quartz that the 1984 film was a good example of Reaganomics, I was curious. Also, with Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis (who died this past week) and Sigourney Weaver, the video was......  [read more]

  • Housing bubble and elasticity and factal math

    A New Cause of the Housing Bubble

    Feb 28, 14 • 934 Views • No Comments

    In the 663 page report from the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission (remember them???), the 2000-2011 real estate boom and bust is blamed on relatively predictable conditions. Just glancing at their chapter titles and conclusions, you can see that they blame......  [read more]