Economic Thinkers

Starting with Adam Smith and The Wealth of Nations, continuing to Malthus, Ricardo, Keynes, Hayek, Friedman, Sen and others, the timeless ideas of economic thinkers provide understanding of the contemporary economy.

  • Economic Development and World Religion

    Economic Development: Buddhist Takeout?

    Dec 21, 12 • 1058 Views • No Comments

    In a northern Thai village, Buddhist monks are no longer taking the traditional morning walk to collect food from their neighbors. Instead, they make a takeout call for a breakfast delivery. Further describing how Temple life is changing, one monk explained......  [read more]

  • texting is 20 years old

    Happy Birthday Texting!

    Dec 14, 12 • 342 Views • No Comments

    Sometimes, you never know… At first, it was just a “Merry Christmas” message sent from a computer terminal to a cell phone. The year was 1992, the firm was Vodafone, and the goal was just a better way for secretaries to page their managers.......  [read more]

  • Is It Better to Outsource or Insource T-shirts?

    Manufacturing Matters in the US

    Dec 10, 12 • 505 Views • No Comments

    Hearing about an apparel firm that “insourced,” I confess I was not as enthusiastic as the report. The firm, American Giant, had just enjoyed a run on their hoodies. As a Made in the USA producer, they have the caché of a San Francisco factory.......  [read more]

  • Decisions Have An Opportunity Cost That Require Tradeoffs

    Behavioral Economics: Better than a Psychiatrist

    Dec 3, 12 • 676 Views • No Comments

    After reading Murder at the Margin, some of my students suggested in essays that we do not need a psychiatrist to explain human behavior. Instead, just ask a behavioral economist. Let’s give it a try… Defaulting: In life, we tend to take the......  [read more]

  • 19th Century Urban Transport Was An Environmental Problem

    Urban Pollution

    Dec 2, 12 • 2601 Views • No Comments

    When we worry about the impact of autos on the environment, perhaps we should remember the horse. In 1880, the horse population in Manhattan and Brooklyn was somewhere between 150,000-175,000 and growing. A basic part of city life, horsecar rides totalled......  [read more]