Innovation is a source of economic growth. Including the impact of new technology and the incentives that stimulate creativity, innovation is important for a market system. Depending on current events, econlife considers the impact and source of past and present innovation that includes the industrial revolution, the transportation revolution, the information revolution and people like Steve Jobs and Andrew Carnegie who made it possible.

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    Breaking An Environmental Law

    Jan 21, 12 • 552 Views • No Comments

    Asked by the Pew Center for the People and the Press to rank 21 issues in terms of their significance, global warming was #21. Similarly pessimistic about climate change initiatives, one researcher asked, “How can one seriously suggest that the village......  [read more]

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    There’s No Such Thing as Free Music…

    Jan 17, 12 • 448 Views • No Comments

    By Mira Korber, guest blogger. You are a young musician on the brink of your professional career. Graduation is in May, orchestra auditions are around the corner, and where do you go to begin preparing? The IMSLP, of course. The what? The “International......  [read more]

  • Twinkie Facts

    Jan 12, 12 • 425 Views • No Comments

    There is more to a Twinkie than sugar, fat, preservatives and artificial flavors. The history of the Twinkie is an economic story. Once upon a time, during the depression, a manufacturer can 30 ingredients. Depression: 1930 first sold WW II rationing:......  [read more]

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    Government’s Venture Capital

    Jan 9, 12 • 475 Views • No Comments

    The Erie Railway went bankrupt multiple times. Primarily government funded, it originally connected 2 small NY communities and cost 4 times more than initial projections when it was completed in 1851.  Citing the financial woes of the Erie Railway, a......  [read more]

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    A Kodak (Missed) Moment

    Jan 7, 12 • 659 Views • No Comments

    Thinking of Kodak, we can remember razor blades and Apples. Soon after it began in 1880, Kodak told us, “You press the button and we do the rest.” Making home photography simple, they just had to sell us a camera; then, as with the razor and......  [read more]