Innovation

Innovation is a source of economic growth. Including the impact of new technology and the incentives that stimulate creativity, innovation is important for a market system. Depending on current events, econlife considers the impact and source of past and present innovation that includes the industrial revolution, the transportation revolution, the information revolution and people like Steve Jobs and Andrew Carnegie who made it possible.

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    An Optional Income Tax

    May 18, 11 • 427 Views • No Comments

    What if you could decide whether to pay an income tax? Boston University economist Laurence Kotlikoff has a plan that gives us a choice. His basic message, though, is that Congress had better start to think creatively because our current system is...  [read more]

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    Creative Incentives

    May 15, 11 • 391 Views • No Comments

    In his New Yorker Magazine article on creativity, Malcolm Gladwell describes Mick Jagger, the musician, and Gary Starkweather, an optical engineer, as gentlemen who pour out countless ideas and develop an endless stream of products. For Jagger, the product is...  [read more]

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    Your Elevator Pitch

    May 13, 11 • 376 Views • No Comments

    What if you had just 1 minute to sell your business idea? According to Marketplace.org, your “elevator pitch” would need, 1) to state the problem you are solving; 2) to explain why your solution will have marketplace success; 3) to present a...  [read more]

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    Yak Herders

    May 3, 11 • 448 Views • No Comments

    Demand is soaring for yartsa gunbu, a “nutty tasting fungus” from China’s Tibetan Plateau and similar Himalayan regions in Nepal and Bhutan. Reputed to have cancer fighting capability, aging retardants, and libidinal qualities, the fungus...  [read more]

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    Health and GDP

    Apr 28, 11 • 373 Views • No Comments

    We are taller, healthier, heavier, and living longer. In 1790, a typical Frenchman weighed 110 pounds. Now, the scale says 170. That 60-pound difference relates to a lot more than food. According to a new book from Nobel prize winning economist Robert Fogel...  [read more]