Regulation

In a market economy, regulation can help or hinder economic activity. Looking at topics that include the environment, financial instruments and anti-trust and past and present Supreme Court cases, econlife considers regulation when it investigates the US market economy.

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    Who Needs a License?

    Feb 9, 11 • 294 Views • No Comments

    What does a hair salon “shampoo specialist” have in common with a private detective? In certain states, each needs a license to do business. But what might licensing involve? For a Texas shampooer, it includes 150 hours of classes while a...  [read more]

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    Getting the Most From Our Money

    Feb 3, 11 • 252 Views • No Comments

    In 2020, according to the World Health Organization, traffic fatalities will be the second leading cause of deaths in the world. Moreover, in the U.S. alone, approximately 57 million birds are killed by cars annually. (from Cool It, p. 154) So, asks Bjorn...  [read more]

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    Grandma and the City

    Jan 31, 11 • 264 Views • No Comments

    In the U.S. 81% of us live in a city. Saying that cities generate more wealth, productivity and innovation, Brookings’ Research Director Alan Berube and Harvard’s Edward Glaeser applaud urbanization. In China, though, Grandma might not be so...  [read more]

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    Hot Spotting Medical Care

    Jan 28, 11 • 259 Views • No Comments

    These are the statistics: 900 people; 4,000 hospital visits; $200 million in medical bills from January 2002 through June 2008. The place is Camden, N.J. where a relatively small number of people were responsible for a huge proportion of the city’s...  [read more]

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    Waste and Cost

    Jan 27, 11 • 269 Views • No Comments

    Who could possibly have disagreed with President Obama when, in his State of the Union address, he said we have to eliminate wasteful regulations?  Some very important people. Emory University economics professor, Paul Rubin, explained in a WSJ article...  [read more]