Thinking Economically

Much more than money, economics is about tradeoffs. Thinking economically involves cost and benefit, marginal analysis and seeing that there is no free lunch. Econlife tries to convey the perspective that is the foundation of economics that helps people make decisions personally, professionally and as voters.

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    Military Business

    Feb 5, 11 • 382 Views • No Comments

    Choosing between “guns and butter” (or missiles and margarine), national leaders think of the military for guns and the private sector for “butter.” Not Egypt, though. As far back as the 1970s, when peace with Israel meant less to do......  [read more]

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    Getting the Most From Our Money

    Feb 3, 11 • 338 Views • No Comments

    In 2020, according to the World Health Organization, traffic fatalities will be the second leading cause of deaths in the world. Moreover, in the U.S. alone, approximately 57 million birds are killed by cars annually. (from Cool It, p. 154) So, asks Bjorn......  [read more]

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    When is 60 a Good Grade?

    Feb 2, 11 • 323 Views • 1 Comment

    At 60.8 percent, the Institute for Supply Management’s (ISM) measure of manufacturing activity was way up, far more than anyone expected. Reflecting expansion, any number above 50 is good. So robust a number takes us to a question. If production is......  [read more]

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    Hot Spotting Medical Care

    Jan 28, 11 • 358 Views • No Comments

    These are the statistics: 900 people; 4,000 hospital visits; $200 million in medical bills from January 2002 through June 2008. The place is Camden, N.J. where a relatively small number of people were responsible for a huge proportion of the city’s......  [read more]

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    Waste and Cost

    Jan 27, 11 • 358 Views • No Comments

    Who could possibly have disagreed with President Obama when, in his State of the Union address, he said we have to eliminate wasteful regulations?  Some very important people. Emory University economics professor, Paul Rubin, explained in a WSJ article......  [read more]