Looking at Australia, the area where she is #1 or #2 display why she is a developed nation.

Six Facts About Australia From The “World Cup of Everything Else”

Jun 17, 2014 • Developing Economies, Economic Growth, Education, Macroeconomic Measurement, Tech • 421 Views    No Comments

In a long list of categories that they called, “The World Cup of Everything Else,” WSJ created brackets from the 32 World Cup teams and determined the winners. In 6 areas, Australia was #1 or #2:

For life expectancy, Australia comes in 2nd:

As a developed nation, Australia's life expectancy is relatively high.

From: WSJ

Here she is #1:

As a developed nation, Australia's low population density is not typical.

From: WSJ

For GDP per capita, among the Word Cup teams, Australia is #2.

A developed nation, Australia has a high per capita GDP.

From: WSJ

Compared to other World Cup teams, Australia has many cars per person:

As a developed nation, Austral has many cars.

Perhaps predictably, she has relatively high CO2 emissions:

As a developed nation, Australia has relatively high CO2 emissions.

From: WSJ

And finally, Australia is almost at the top for the number of McDonalds for each person (but not Starbucks–The US is #1 and South Korea #2)

As a developed nation, Australia has a high number of McDonalds per person

From: WSJ

Our bottom line: The characteristics that Australia shared with her “toughest competition” in this WSJ tournament were typical of developed nations. We only needed to add an educated populace and advanced technology.

The brackets convey a wealth of information. Please let us know in a comment any conclusions you would add.

Sources and more...A clever idea, "The World Cup of Everything Else" came from WSJ.com. Including categories like who has the most water (the Netherlands.), the entire list is fun to skim.

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