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Money and Happiness

Jun 8, 2010 • Thinking Economically • 162 Views    No Comments

Does money buy happiness? A 2006 report from the Pew Research Center said yes and no.

If we compare income groups, the answer is yes. Almost 50% of people earning more than $100,000 annually said they were happy. However, as income levels dropped, so too did happiness. Only 24% of those who earned $30,000 a year said they were happy.

Pew researchers, though, have been asking the same question for three decades during which per capita income has risen. As a nation, we are richer and yet happiness levels have remained constant. They did discover, though, that when we discover we are earning more than others, we do experience a pop in happiness.

In another study Richard Easterlin investigated whether we experienced increasingly more or less happiness each time our income grew. If, he hypotheisized, our behavior paralleled typical economic behavior (diminishing marginal utility), we would display less extra happiness with increases in income. Instead, he found no marginal utility. There was no increase in happiness.

I do suspect though that the recession has affected happiness for many of us.

Your interpretation?

The Economic Lesson

When eating chocolate chip cookies, our total utility (satisfaction) usually increases. However, economists like to point out that the increase-the marginal utility- for each additional cookie is less and less. Numerically, we could say the first cookie gives us 10 units of utillity as does the second one. Then though, a third cookie might provide 3 units of pleasure and the fourth one only one unit of pleasure. Adding them all together, our pleasure is ascending. However, as we eat more and more, pleasure rises more slowly. Economists call this phenomenom diminishing marginal utility.

 

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