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State By State Gender Pay Gaps

Nov 18, 2013 • Demand, Supply, and Markets, Financial Markets, Gender Issues, Government, Households, Labor, Macroeconomic Measurement, Thinking Economically • 447 Views    No Comments

At 15 cents, the gender wage gap is smallest in Vermont and Nevada. It expands to 36 cents in Wyoming.

Comparing all women to all men, though, is tricky. We have the single female professionals who have no gender wage gap and other women who do. We throw together professions where the gap might not exist and others where it is large. So, remembering what follows is an overview that can be problematic, here are the state to state data for 2012:

Gender Pay Gap by State

Data From American Community Survey 2012; average amount earned by women for every dollar earned by men.

 

Next, encouraged to think at the margin by most economists, we should ask about the impact of the extra $11,000 or so that the “average woman” earning  a median income of $37,791 will not take home annually compared to the average male earning $49,398 (2012). Covering consumption and human capital that will have a return, the infographic (2010) from The Center for American Progress omits one key category that when compounded will incrementally affect lifetime wealth: saving and investing.

Gender pay gap spending

From the Center for American Progress, 2010.

 

Sources and Resources: For the best unbiased gender wage gap analysis and data, I recommend this Atlantic article. Their springboard was work from the Center for American Progress. Here, you can play the “Game of Wages.” And, Catalyst has a wealth of factual data.

Please note that this post was slightly edited after it appeared.

 

 

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