competitive market structure strategies

The Boardroom Still Has a Glass Ceiling

Dec 16, 2013 • Businesses, Economic Debates, Economic History, Gender Issues, Government, Labor, Regulation, Thinking Economically • 374 Views    No Comments

Our Monday gender issues blog:

With Mary Barra soon ascending to the top of GM, she will also become the fifth woman on their 12 person Board of Directors. The boards of only 4 other Fortune 500 companies–Estée Lauder, Avon Products, Procter & Gamble, Interpublic Group–are 40% female. By contrast, 50 Fortune 500 companies have no female directors.

First, by percent, you can see which countries have the most women on corporate boards:

Women in the Boardroom

 

Women in the Boardroom

 

 

Women in the Boardroom

Next, for 2013 Fortune 500 CEOs, the numbers are similarly skewed:

  • Men: 95.8%
  • Women: 4.2%

And finally, for 2013, Fortune 500 Executive Officer Top Earner Positions:

  • Men: 91.9%
  • Women: 8.1%

The German government will be debating if companies listed on the DAX index should be required by 2016 to have no less than 30% of their directors’ positions held by women. Should government be involved with the underutilization of human capital that the boardroom glass ceiling creates? Your opinion?

Sources and Resources: Always an excellent source of facts and reports on women at work, a Catalyst report and the graphs I recreated from their Knowledge Center complemented the information I used from a Fortune blog while here, Catalyst lists female Fortune 1000 CEOs. In the past, econlife has looked at the glass ceiling and at women in the boardroom.

 

 

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